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fuckeverythingandsociety:

In the 70’s they blamed the Dobermans. In the 80’s the German Shepherds. In the 90’s they blamed the Rottweilers. Now they blame Pit bulls. The animal is not to blame it’s the owner. There’s no such thing as a bad dog just a bad owner. Dogs don’t organize dog fights. Dogs don’t profit off dog fights. Dogs are the victims here. Seems like these days the victim is always blamed. Stop being ignorant. And stop the people who are organizing dog fights. Don’t blame the dog. Blame the person behind the dog.

fuckeverythingandsociety:

In the 70’s they blamed the Dobermans. In the 80’s the German Shepherds. In the 90’s they blamed the Rottweilers. Now they blame Pit bulls. The animal is not to blame it’s the owner. There’s no such thing as a bad dog just a bad owner. Dogs don’t organize dog fights. Dogs don’t profit off dog fights. Dogs are the victims here. Seems like these days the victim is always blamed. Stop being ignorant. And stop the people who are organizing dog fights. Don’t blame the dog. Blame the person behind the dog.

(via maliceinhorrorlandx)

— 12 hours ago with 6901 notes
paintingses:


Girl With Cherries (detail); attributed to Giovanni Ambrogio de Predis (circa 1455-after 1508), but possibly by Giovanni Antonio Boltraffio (1467–1516)
oil on wood, c. 1491-5

"Girl with Cherries […] shows an artist grappling with Leonardo’s ideas and technique […] The vibrant sense of life in her curls is a testament to Leonardo’s love of the movement of hair, which he saw as similar to water currents and other paradigms of motion and which he studied in many drawings." [source]

paintingses:

Girl With Cherries (detail); attributed to Giovanni Ambrogio de Predis (circa 1455-after 1508), but possibly by Giovanni Antonio Boltraffio (1467–1516)

oil on wood, c. 1491-5

"Girl with Cherries […] shows an artist grappling with Leonardo’s ideas and technique […] The vibrant sense of life in her curls is a testament to Leonardo’s love of the movement of hair, which he saw as similar to water currents and other paradigms of motion and which he studied in many drawings." [source]

(via whiskeyandtragedy)

— 12 hours ago with 852 notes